Films

Films

Films page: new text required

  • This exciting and compelling one hour documentary invites viewers into the lives of contemporary Native American role models living in the Midwest. It dispels the myth that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon, and reveals how they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their culture alive, and make great contributions to society. Their experiences will deeply touch both Natives and non-Natives and help build bridges of understanding, respect, and communication.

  • For Navajo and Hopi Tribes, running is more than a sport. The film moves beyond stereotypes of the past and present as two high school boys' cross country teams--Tuba City and Chinle--compete for the state championship title.

  • A provocative film from the American Indian perspective that reframes today’s controversial energy debate while the fate of the environment hangs in the balance. Red Power Energy illustrates the complex realities of Indian reservations grappling with how to balance their natural resources with their traditional beliefs.

  • Following a heated primary election for the Presidency of the Navajo Nation, "Remember My Name" examines the world of LGBTQ rights and the meaning of identity in the largest Native American tribe in the United States.

  • Historical trauma in Native peoples has produced other traumas: abuse, neglect and addiction. However, from tapping the healing power that is within them there are powerful stories of healing strategies occurring now in tribal communities.

  • Return to Rainy Mountain is a feature length documentary film that tells the story of N. Scott Momaday. It is a personal account of his life and legacy told in his own voice, and in the voice of his daughter Jill. Momaday speaks of his Kiowa roots, family, literature, oral tradition, nature, identity, and the sacred and important things that have shaped his life.

  • Lakota youth in particular are eager to re-appropriate the language and its embedded concepts of place, ethics, action and purpose--on their own terms, sometimes in ways that clash with others' expectations or the status quo.

  • Explore the origins and complexity of the Native American Church through the lens of practicing Navajo "Roadmen." Follow these NAC spiritual leaders in Navajo land as they travel to the peyote fields in Texas, deal with the Federal government and protect their religious freedom from both Navajo and outside forces.

  • This feature documentary, about the role of Native Americans in popular music history, tells the story of a profound, essential, and, until now, missing chapter in the history of American music: the Indigenous influence. Featuring music icons Charley Patton, Mildred Bailey, Link Wray, Jimi Hendrix, Jesse Ed Davis, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Robbie Robertson, Randy Castillo, and others, Rumble will show how these talented Native musicians helped shape the soundtracks of our lives.

  • The history of lacrosse in North America is a rich and multi-layered one. Much more than a Native American ball and stick game, lacrosse is a cultural window into Native American communities and their historical relationship with each other and the dominant culture.

  • Cory Mann is a quirky businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska. He gets hungry for smoked salmon and decides to spend a summer smoking fish. The unusual story of his life and the untold history of his people interweave with the process of preparing traditional food and keeping his business afloat.

  • SOL explores the death of a young Inuk man, Solomon Tapatiaq Uyarasuk, who is found dead in an RCMP detachment in a remote Inuit community. The locals suspect murder, but the police suggest suicide. As the documentary investigates the truth to Solomon’s death it sheds light on the underlying social issues of Canada’s North that has resulted in this region claiming one of the highest youth suicide rates in the world.

  • When you hear the phrase "Native American music" you may not think of tubas, trumpets and Sousa marches. Yet, this rich musical tradition has been a part of Native American culture for over one hundred years. Sousa on the Rez: Marching to the Beat of a Different Drum is a half-hour documentary that offers viewers an unexpected and engaging picture of this little-known Native music scene.

  • This documentary celebrates the spectacular beadwork of the Northwest Plateau People. The film provides a rare opportunity to experience Plateau culture through the eyes and hearts of artists, who share their history, motivation, and the beadwork that plays an important role in binding their culture together. Native Plateau beadwork is part of the rich tapestry of American culture. Plateau culture is unique and its story of survival a quintessentially American story.

  • In 1877, the Ponca people were exiled from their Nebraska homeland to Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. To honor his dying son's last wish to be buried in his homeland, Chief Standing Bear set-off on a grueling, 600-mile journey home. Captured en-route, Standing Bear sued a famous U.S. army general for his freedom.

  • Indigenous communities around the world and in the U.S. resist threats to their sacred places—the original protected lands—in a growing movement to defend human rights and restore the environment.

  • When the Oglala Sioux Tribe passed an ordinance separating industrial hemp from its illegal cousin, marijuana, Alex White Plume researched hemp and found it to be a versatile, sustainable crop that could grow in the inhospitable soil of the South Dakota Badlands--envisioning a new economy.

  • For over 50 years, archaeologist Dr. Douglas Anderson, of Brown University, studied the Iñupiaq Natives of Northwestern Alaska. When one of the last excavations of his career shuts down due to the discovery of human remains, he must rely on the relationships he has built with the Iñupiaq. Policy dictates that archaeological excavations on National Park Service land must stop when remains are found and all living descendants be notified. Are the relationships between Anderson and the Iñupiaq based purely on his own academic pursuits?

  • On June 7, 1964, a driving rain buckled dams and flooded vehicles on the Blackfeet Reservation, sweeping crying children from mothers’ arms, and ferrying homes and bodies across the prairie. By the time it ended, more than two-dozen Blackfeet Indians had drowned in the worst natural disaster in Montana history. More than a half-century after the worst disaster in Montana history, two Blackfeet families struggle to come to terms with the 1964 flood.

  • The EPA calls the mining town of Picher, Oklahoma, the most toxic place in America, but the Quapaw Tribe still calls it home. Today, the town is divided by fears of serious health risks, environmental politics, civic pride and old racial tensions between the Quapaw people and the non-Indian community who share the town.

  • Renowned sculptor John Houser has a dream to build the world's tallest bronze equestrian statue for the city of El Paso, Texas--a stunning monument to Spanish conquistador Juan de Onate that will honor the contributions Hispanic people made to the American West. However, Native Americans are outraged.

  • In the town of Shiprock, New Mexico., poverty and corruption have long been a struggle and as the Navajo Nation looks for leadership, it is met with scandal. To make a change, a young group of men and women are taking back their community--led by 21-year-old Graham Beyale. This is the story of how one will make a difference and inspire a generation of leaders to make changes in their own communities.

  • Two brothers from the Onondaga Nation pursue their dreams of playing lacrosse for Syracuse University. With the dream nearly in reach, the boys are caught in a constant struggle to define their Native identity, live-up to their family's expectations and balance challenges on and off the Reservation.

    Follow-up series now available
    The Medicine Game: Four Brothers, One Dream

  • The first film to document the story of Michigan's Native Americans in the Civil War who served in Company K of the 1st Michigan Sharpshooters. During the Civil War a regiment of sharpshooters was being recruited to fight for the Union. Since Michigan's Native Americans were famous as skilled hunters, it was decided to recruit one company--Company K--from among the tribes in Michigan.

  • St. Michael is a village of 370 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska, 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is isolated and remote. Priests became trusted elders in the community, but weird things would start to happen upon their arrival in 1968 when Father Endal, Deacon Lundowski and Brother Smario arrived at the Catholic Church.

  • At the age of five, Walter Littlemoon (Lakota) was removed from his family to attend a federal government boarding school where his culture, language and spirituality were suppressed. Embark on Walter's journey to heal himself and his community while reclaiming his heritage.

  • THROUGH THE REPELLENT FENCE follows art collective Postcommodity as they strive to construct Repellent Fence, a two-mile-long outdoor artwork that straddles the U.S.-Mexico border. Postcommodity consists of three Native American artists who “put land art in a tribal context.” Aided by the communities on both sides of the border in 2015, the artists installed a series of 28 huge inflatable spheres emblazoned with an insignia known as the “open eye” that has existed in Indigenous cultures from South America to Canada for thousands of years.

Pages

 
 

Stations

Filmmakers


• Tips on Launching a Film Sequel on YouTube
• Thousands Stream Films From 40 Films Project
• Producer Hopes Film Inspires Viewers to Create Change
• Job Opportunities
• Film Festival Opportunities
• Training and Other Opportunities
• Funding Opportunities
• Fellowship and Internship Opportunities

Educators

Should tribes like the Shoshone and Arapaho attempt to bring back beautiful ancestral objects—drums, pipes, eagle wing fans, medicine bags, weapons, and ceremonial attire that ar