Films

Films

Films page: new text required

  • Clearwater is about the health of the Puget Sound and the unique relationship of the tribal people to the water. We will meet geoduck divers, listen to elders, travel with fisherman, learn from biologists, and explore with the youth as we come to understand the beauty of the regions culture and the impending impacts of ocean acidification.

  • Growing Native will be a seven-part series focusing on reclaiming traditional knowledge and food ways to address critical issues of health and wellness, the environment and human rights.

  • In the Beginning was Water and Sky is a short-form New Media project that tells two parallel stories about a Chippewa boy who runs away from an Indian Boarding School in the 1950s and a Chippewa girl who runs away from her village in the 1700s.

  • This series shares contemporary stories about Native peoples to educate and entertain viewers, empower Indigenous peoples and bridge culture gaps. It seeks to shatter stereotypes, promote positivity and show the world who we really are.

  • Injunuity 2 is a half-hour documentary made up of nine short films using a mix of animation, music, and real Native voices. Together, the pieces create a thought-provoking collage of reflections on modern America from a contemporary Native perspective.

  • Today, only 41 fluent Native speakers of the Kodiak Alutiiq language remain, mostly Elders.

  • What does blood have to do with identity? Kendra Mylnechuk, an adult Native adoptee, born in 1980 at the cusp of the enactment of the Indian Child Welfare Act, is on a journey to reconnect with her birth family and discover her Lummi heritage.

  • When the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers attempts to take their land to build Kinzua Dam, the Seneca people stand up to the government and prevailing political forces of the 1950s and 60s to save their culture, their sovereignty, and their way of life to preserve their future. This film explores the history of Kinzua Dam on the Allegheny River in Pennsylvania and its impact on the Seneca Nation.

  • The North Arctic landscape is changing rapidly--so too are the lives of Inupiat Natives living on the tiny, vanishing island of Kivalina, Alaska. Many believe global warming is to blame, but filmmakers show how one humble village fights to save their homeland under a cloud of doubt.

  • Mankiller explores the life of Wilma Mankiller, the first female Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation who led her people in building one of the strongest Indian Tribes in America. More than a biography, the program delivers an empowering message. 

  • For decades, thousands of Navajos worked the railroads, maintaining the trans-continental network. Metal Road explores the dynamics of livelihood, family and the railroads through the lens of a Navajo trackman. The film follows three Navajo railroaders from the 9001 Heavy Steel Gang as they leave their homeland to replace aging railroad tracks from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean under extreme weather conditions.

  • N. Scott Momaday is a significant literary figure, who over a lifetime has created exquisite literary works in multiple genres. These works reflect his mythic roots in Kiowa culture and American Indian Oral Tradition. Primarily considering himself a poet, Momaday is able to articulate his Kiowa culture as well as Euro-American historic and literary narratives.

  • Neon Buffalo examines the history of Indian gaming from the first bingo halls to today's destination resorts. This feature-length documentary film delves deeper into Indian Gaming than slot machines and black jack tables to explore Indian gaming's role as the economic measure of a social revolution that began throughout Indian Country decades before the first casino doors opened. 

  • This documentary follows Kate Beane, a young Dakota women, as she examines the extraordinary life of her celebrated relative, Charles Eastman (Ohiyesa). Biography and journey come together as Kate traces Eastman’s path—from traditional Dakota boyhood, through education at Dartmouth College, and in later roles as physician, author, lecturer, and Native American advocate.

  • A stunning coming-of-age journey set on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Set against a background of rising tension and protest, a Lakota teenager learns first-hand what it means to lead a new generation and enter adulthood in a world where the odds are stacked against him.

  • Following a heated primary election for the Presidency of the Navajo Nation, "Remember My Name" examines the world of LGBTQ rights and the meaning of identity in the largest Native American tribe in the United States.

  • Historical trauma in Native peoples has produced other traumas: abuse, neglect and addiction. However, from tapping the healing power that is within them there are powerful stories of healing strategies occurring now in tribal communities.

  • Return to Rainy Mountain is a feature length documentary film that tells the story of N. Scott Momaday. It is a personal account of his life and legacy told in his own voice, and in the voice of his daughter Jill. Momaday speaks of his Kiowa roots, family, literature, oral tradition, nature, identity, and the sacred and important things that have shaped his life.

  • Explore the origins and complexity of the Native American Church through the lens of practicing Navajo "Roadmen." Follow these NAC spiritual leaders in Navajo land as they travel to the peyote fields in Texas, deal with the Federal government and protect their religious freedom from both Navajo and outside forces.

  • On June 7, 1964, a driving rain buckled dams and flooded vehicles on the Blackfeet Reservation, sweeping crying children from mothers’ arms, and ferrying homes and bodies across the prairie. By the time it ended, more than two-dozen Blackfeet Indians had drowned in the worst natural disaster in Montana history. More than a half-century after the worst disaster in Montana history, two Blackfeet families struggle to come to terms with the 1964 flood.

  • In the town of Shiprock, New Mexico., poverty and corruption have long been a struggle and as the Navajo Nation looks for leadership, it is met with scandal. To make a change, a young group of men and women are taking back their community--led by 21-year-old Graham Beyale. This is the story of how one will make a difference and inspire a generation of leaders to make changes in their own communities.

  • THROUGH THE REPELLENT FENCE follows art collective Postcommodity as they strive to construct Repellent Fence, a two-mile-long outdoor artwork that straddles the U.S.-Mexico border. Postcommodity consists of three Native American artists who “put land art in a tribal context.” Aided by the communities on both sides of the border in 2015, the artists installed a series of 28 huge inflatable spheres emblazoned with an insignia known as the “open eye” that has existed in Indigenous cultures from South America to Canada for thousands of years.

  • Two Native American judges reach back to traditional concepts of justice in order to reduce incarceration rates, foster greater safety for their communities, and create a more positive future for their youth. By addressing the root causes of crime, they are providing models of restorative justice that are working. Mainstream courts across the country are taking notice. 

Pages

 
 

Stations

Filmmakers


• Tips on Launching a Film Sequel on YouTube
• Thousands Stream Films From 40 Films Project
• Producer Hopes Film Inspires Viewers to Create Change
• Job Opportunities
• Film Festival Opportunities
• Training and Other Opportunities
• Funding Opportunities
• Fellowship and Internship Opportunities

Educators

Should tribes like the Shoshone and Arapaho attempt to bring back beautiful ancestral objects—drums, pipes, eagle wing fans, medicine bags, weapons, and ceremonial attire that ar