Leya Hale is an American Indian filmmaker from the Sisseton Wahpeton Dakota and Diné Nations. She currently works as an Associate Producer for Twin Cities PBS.

The following are video chapters created to match lesson plans outlined in the Yellow Fever Educational Guide.

Click the title of the chapter to see video.

Tina Garnanez grew up in Farmington and Oaksprings on the Navajo Nation. She was recruited into the military right out of high school where she spent time as a medic in Iraq. Upon her return to the U.S., she started advocating for peace and veterans issues.

Recently, Vision Maker Media executive director Shirley Sneve (Lakota) caught up with Sydney Freeland (Navajo) after a screening of her movie Drunktown's Finest at imagineNATIVE. The two talked about the representation of Native Americans in film, the struggles and rewards of being a filmmaker, and how Sydney got to where she is now.

“The early bird gets the worm,” my dad would always say. He is notorious for waking up between four and four-thirty in the morning. In those early dark hours, you can hear his steps, the smell of coffee brewing, and the sound of newspaper pages turning. I’m not going to lie. I was incredibly annoyed by this, much like the rest of my siblings. Admittedly, I took a lot of my parents’ teachings for granted at an early age. Today, I have a deep appreciation for my dad and the lessons he offers.

The 1491s are a comedic group that travels the nation telling Native stories and bringing various social issues to light. They describe themselves as a “gaggle of Indians chock full of cynicism and splashed with a good dose of indigenous satire.” The 1491s got their start when the father of Dallas Goldtooth married the mother of Migizi Pensoneau. Growing up, the two boys made videos for fun. Eventually, the three other members asked to join in.

From Tohatchi, New Mexico, on the Navajo Reservation, Ramona Emerson (Diné) is a filmmaker who received her degree in Media Arts from the University of New Mexico in 1997 and has worked as a professional videographer, writer, and editor. Over her thirteen-year career, Emerson has received support from the State of New Mexico, National Geographic, Sundance Institute, and the Ford Foundation.

Joey Stylez is Cree-Metis and a Moosomin First Nations Tribal member. Moosmin is located in Saskatchewan, Canada. He had a rough upbringing and overcame that by using his talent for putting a positive light on his Native heritage.

Louie Gonnie is Dine from the Navajo Nation in New Mexico. Louie admired his father and uncles and wanted to be like them so he began to sing in the Native American Church. He is also a well rounded artist, expressing himself in music, art and writing.

Louie started singing for family and friends. Eventually, people were recording his music and he realized that he could have a career as a recording artist. His albums started out as Peyote songs of the Native American Church. Since then he has created a more contemporary style.

Devin Whirlwindsoldier is Lakota and Diné. He was raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. He grew up singing with various drum groups on the pow wow trail. Devin was able to stay positive and out of trouble through singing.

He united with Stephen Yellowhawk and the duo formed “Buddaz and Stephen” and recorded their first album titled “Northern Lights.” Devin and Stephen also have recorded another project with RSBK (Ricky, Stephen, Buddaz & Kilo) titled RSBK. Devin is in the process of recording his next project.

Quese Imc is an award-winning Hip Hop emcee, independent music producer and cultural activist. Quese is a member of the Pawnee and Seminole Nations. Quese and his brother are founding members of Native Hip Hop group “Culture Shock Camp.”

Lakota Jonez is Cherokee, Mohawk and Lakota. She was born in Florida and grew up all over the East Coast and Canada. She began performing at an early age--first in ballet, then writing, poetry, lyrics and finally music. Lakota wrote lyrics and poetry in high school and later found herself immersed in  Hip-Hop music. "Writing Hip-Hop lyrics was like telling a story," she said.

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