Alaska Native

This is the emotional story of Samuel Johns, proudly sober Alaska Native hip hop artist, father, and advocate for Anchorage's homeless as he takes bold steps, stumbles, grows, and picks himself up time after time in a trajectory of rising leadership for Alaska Native youth.

ATTLA tells the gripping but virtually unknown story of George Attla, an Alaska Native dogsled racer who, with one good leg and one outlandish dream, dominated the sport for five decades, becoming a rockstar figure for both Natives and whites.

From Kartemquin Films (Hoop Dreams, Life Itself), Keep Talking follows four Alaska Native women learning to teach their critically endangered language.

For centuries survival was difficult for Alaska Native peoples, but they lived full lives. Today survival is easier, but they are dying young.

For over 50 years, archaeologist Dr. Douglas Anderson, of Brown University, studied the Iñupiaq Natives of Northwestern Alaska. When one of the last excavations of his career shuts down due to the discovery of human remains, he must rely on the relationships he has built with the Iñupiaq.

Four Inuit athletes travel throughout Alaska competing in the ancestral games of strength. Acrobatic and explosive, these sports are vital for survival in the frigid, hostile Arctic. As waves of change sweep across their traditional lands, their role is stronger than ever.

Kavelina Torres is an Alaska Native hailing from the Yup'ik, Inupiaq and Athabascan Nations. She lives in North Pole, Alaska where life is rich and full of diversity.

Cory Mann is a quirky businessman hustling to make a dollar in Juneau, Alaska. He gets hungry for smoked salmon and decides to spend a summer smoking fish. The unusual story of his life and the untold history of his people interweave with the process of preparing traditional food and keeping his business afloat.

St. Michael is a village of 370 residents on the southwest coast of Alaska, 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle. It is isolated and remote. Priests became trusted elders in the community, but weird things would start to happen upon their arrival in 1968 when Father Endal, Deacon Lundowski and Brother Smario arrived at the Catholic Church.

For thousands of years, traditional Inuit sports have been vital for survival within the unforgiving Arctic. Acrobatic and explosive, these ancestral games evolved to strengthen mind, body and spirit within the community. Following four modern Inuit athletes reveals their unique relationship to the games as they compete across the North.

Like Native Americans in the lower 48, Alaska Natives struggled to keep their basic human rights, as well as protect their ancient ties to the land. The Bill of Rights did not apply to them. Through extensive reenactments, the film reveals the remarkable people and their struggle for civil rights.

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Should tribes like the Shoshone and Arapaho attempt to bring back beautiful ancestral objects—drums, pipes, eagle wing fans, medicine bags, weapons, and ceremonial attire that ar