Environment

November 1, 2016
The tiny town of KIVALINA lies on a fragile barrier island along the Chukchi Sea, 83 miles above the Arctic Circle.

The EPA calls the mining town of Picher, Oklahoma the most toxic place in America, but the Quapaw tribe still calls it home. Today the town is divided by fears of serious health risks, environmental politics, civic pride, and old racial tensions between the Quapaw people and the non-Indian community who share the town.

Wild rice, or manoomin, is still harvested the traditional way by the Anishanabe, or Ojibwe people of the Great Lakes Region. Ricers and their families take canoes in the rice fields and hand harvest the rice.

The people of the Yurok Tribe live off the bounty of the Pacific Coast on the banks of California's Klamath River, harvesting Salmon, shellfish, seaweed and edible wild greens along with acorns which are ground and cooked in tightly woven handmade baskets.

There is a movement among Tribes to bring the buffalo back to the Great Plains in order to promote cultural enhancement, spiritual revitalization, ecological restoration and economic development. Loretta travels to the buffalo range of Fred Dubray on the Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation in South Dakota to learn more.

When thinking of the cuisine of the southwest, most people think of Mexican food. But Native foods in their traditional form are an exciting way of expressing this beautiful and rugged region of the country.

Over 6,000 years before the Acadian French (today's Cajuns) arrived in Louisiana, there were Native peoples living and fishing in Louisiana's bayou country. An historical tour of this Gulf Coast region provides a lesson about Native influences on Cajun cooking. Loretta cooks Sassafras Shrimp Gumbo and Spicy Alligator Sauce Piquant.

Walking in Two Worlds journeys to the Tongass to reveal its splendor and shed light on the devastation and division resulting from the Settlement Act. The Tongass is rich with old-growth trees, salmon-filled rivers and wildlife. Alaska’s Tlingit and Haida Indian tribes have depended on this forest for their culture and survival.

In 2004, thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers from all four corners, moved by their concern for our planet, came together at a historic gathering, where they decided to form an alliance: The International Council of Thirteen Indigenous Grandmothers. This is their story.

Facing the Storm documents the complete history of human relations with the largest land mammal on the continent.

Seven Generation River profiles the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi located in Dowagiac Michigan, about their cultural and historical ties to environment--specifically water resources.

Jack Kohler (Karuk/Yurok/Hoopa) returns to his tribe to discover how politics and economics have impacted tribal fishing and the environment after industry changes the Klamath River's ecosystem. Eight years in the making, River of Renewal chronicles the ongoing battle over the resources of Northern California's and Oregon's Klamath Basin.

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Should tribes like the Shoshone and Arapaho attempt to bring back beautiful ancestral objects—drums, pipes, eagle wing fans, medicine bags, weapons, and ceremonial attire that ar